Category Archives: Walk the Talk

Chores for a Cause

Today, Women’s Community Shelters are launching a new, innovative fund-raising campaign. A pioneering program building young people’s awareness of gender inequality and domestic violence and women’s homelessness, Chores for a Cause empowers young people aged 8-18 to support the women and children in need in their community by completing chores in exchange for money they can then donate to the shelter of their choice.

Support your local shelter – and sweep aside traditional views about who does what chores at home.

WCS would be thrilled if kids could raise up to $25.  Why not more? This isn’t just about a few young people doing the heavy lifting and raising lots of money. This is an opportunity for everyone to feel they can pitch in and do their little bit too. Because solving domestic and family violence and homelessness needs everyone to care and contribute.

The program launches September 1 – just in time for spring cleaning!

WCS CEO, Annabelle Daniel OAM says; “Domestic and family violence is a chronic and ongoing social problem that spikes during times of widespread disaster and stress. Charities are often the very first responders to the vulnerable, the isolated and the homeless who are at particular risk right now during this pandemic. We have seen significant numbers of potential fundraising events planned for WCS and our shelter network cancelled for the foreseeable future. Innovative, positive campaigns like this one have the potential to not only help our sector raise much needed funds, but to provide a sense of hope.”  

This initiative offers a powerful opportunity to start some really important, age-appropriate conversations in our homes and schools around chore equity.

Our Education Officer, Dannielle Miller explains why this is not only brilliant for our shelters, but for the kids who roll up their sleeves and support the initiative too: “This initiative offers a powerful opportunity to start some really important, age-appropriate conversations in our homes and schools around chore equity (what sort of chores do families need to do, and how often does each family member usually spend on these?), gender stereotyping (there’s no such thing as girls’ work and boys’ work – we can all do all the things!) and respectful relationships (every member of a family should feel safe and respected). The research also clearly shows that meaningful fund-raising opportunities like this one are just what our young people need right now. During times of uncertainty, altruistic acts boost our morale, foster a sense of connection, and give us back a sense of control.”